You asked: Why do my teeth hurt after using electric toothbrush?

“Excessive brushing with manual or electric has its risks,” Friedman says. “Too much pressure and too frequent brushing can abrade enamel, or the root if the gum has receded.” This abrasion, he says, can cause teeth to become hypersensitive to hot and/or cold.

Can an electric toothbrush make your teeth hurt?

Using an electric toothbrush won’t damage your teeth — but misusing one can lead to tooth damage, sensitivity, and gum recession.

Why you shouldn’t use an electric toothbrush?

While electric toothbrushes can be a useful tool to keep your smile both beautiful and healthy, knowing how to properly use it is essential. Those who do not use the brush properly can cause trauma to the delicate tissues of the gums, which can lead to the gums receding.

Do I need to floss if I use an electric toothbrush?

Do you have to floss if you use an electric toothbrush? Regardless of what kind of toothbrush you use — and how good your brushing technique is — it can’t replace flossing.

How many times a day should you use an electric toothbrush?

Now that you’ve chosen an electric brush over a manual one, make sure you use it two times every day. Of course, you can’t count on brushing alone – maintain a healthy hygiene routine by flossing daily and scheduling dental exams and cleanings twice a year.

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Do electric toothbrushes ruin enamel?

Gentle on gums

Used properly, an electric toothbrush should not hurt your gums or enamel but instead promote overall oral health. Many people are guilty of brushing too hard, which can, over time, cause irreversible damage to tooth enamel and can cause receding gums, which is also irreversible.

Do electric toothbrushes tickle?

A friendly warning: sonic toothbrushes tickle (a lot!!) when you first use them–don’t give up; it only took me about three times of using it for the tickle to go away.

Can Philips Sonicare damage your teeth?

They found that sonic toothbrushes caused the most abrasion to the dentin, followed by oscillating, and that manual brushes—especially those with rippled bristles—created the least. Another simulated brushing study, this one published in 2013 in the journal Clinical Oral Investigations, had somewhat different results.